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 Table of Contents  
ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2008  |  Volume : 8  |  Issue : 3  |  Page : 154-155

A simple method to protect crown margins from moisture during cementation


Prosthodontics, Crown and Bridge, KLE's Institute of Dental Sciences, Belgaum, Karnataka, India

Date of Web Publication30-Mar-2009

Correspondence Address:
Ajaykumar Ashokkumar Nayak
S#1, Sneha Apartments, 314 Roy Road, Tilakwadi, Belgaum-590 006, Karnataka
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/0972-4052.49020

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  Abstract 

Glass ionomer cement is commonly used as a luting cement, owing to its excellent bond to tooth structure and metal, strength, radiopacity and handling properties. However, contamination with water or saliva is considered to be an important clinical problem with glass-ionomer cements, affecting the properties of the material. This article describes a simple method to protect crown margins from moisture, during cementation with petroleum jelly.

Keywords: Glass ionomer cement, moisture isolation, petroleum jelly


How to cite this article:
Nayak AA. A simple method to protect crown margins from moisture during cementation. J Indian Prosthodont Soc 2008;8:154-5

How to cite this URL:
Nayak AA. A simple method to protect crown margins from moisture during cementation. J Indian Prosthodont Soc [serial online] 2008 [cited 2021 Jan 20];8:154-5. Available from: https://www.j-ips.org/text.asp?2008/8/3/154/49020


  Introduction Top


Glass ionomer cement is used to lute cast restorations in dentistry, because of its excellent bond to tooth structure and metal, strength, radiopacity and handling properties. When placing the material and during initial setting, there arises a need to control moisture, which is acknowledged as the major problem with glass-ionomer cements. When such control is lacking, it causes faster damage to material, leading to deterioration of physical, chemical and mechanical properties. [1]

Contamination with water or saliva is considered to be an important clinical problem. [2] To prevent early contamination by moisture while the cement is setting, application of another material with low-water penetration like wax, varnish, resin or petroleum jelly has been recommended. [3],[4],[5],[6] This article describes a simple method to protect crown margins from moisture during cementation with petroleum jelly.

Procedure

  1. The tip of a disposable syringe (DispoVan, Hindustan Syringes and Medical Devices Ltd, Faridabad, India.) is trimmed and commercially available polyvinyl siloxane light body dispensing tip (Aquasil, Dentsply International, USA.) is attached to that portion. The dispensing tip is modified to allow sufficient bulk of petroleum jelly to be delivered rapidly to the margin. Load Vaseline (white petroleum jelly I.P., Bioline, Biopharm Laboratories Bangalore, India.) in the syringe [Figure 1].
  2. Cement the crown restoration in the usual manner with any moisture controlling technique. Remove excess cement from the crown margin during the setting stage. Apply petroleum jelly around the entire circumference of the crown margin [Figure 2].


After completion of the setting stage, remove the petroleum jelly with cotton roll.

 
  References Top

1.
Davidson CL, Mjor IA. Advances in Glass-ionomer Cements. 1 st ed. Quintessence Publishing Co; 1999. p. 246.  Back to cited text no. 1
    
2.
American Dental Association Council on Dental Materials, Instruments, and Equipment. Using glass ionomers. J Am Dent Assoc 1990;121:181-5.  Back to cited text no. 2
    
3.
McLean JW. Glass-ionomer cements. Br Dent J 1988;164:293-300.  Back to cited text no. 3
    
4.
Earl MS, Hume WR, Mount GJ. Effect of varnishes and other surface treatments on water movement across the glass ionomer cement surface. Aust Dent J 1985;3:298-301.  Back to cited text no. 4
    
5.
Chadwick BL, Treasure ET, Playle RA. A randomised controlled trial to determine the effectiveness of glass ionomer sealants in pre-school children. Caries Res 2005;39:34-40.  Back to cited text no. 5
    
6.
Rajesh P, Kamath MP. Application of glass-ionomer cements in restorative dentistry. Indian J Dent Res 1999;10:88-90.  Back to cited text no. 6
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    Figures

  [Figure 1], [Figure 2]



 

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